Month: July 2019

A disabled woman is seeking a judicial review by t

first_imgA disabled woman is seeking a judicial review by the high court of the errors she says were made in dealing with her claim for personal independence payment (PIP), and which she believes put her life at risk.Angela Kennedy, from Essex, says the errors by the Atos assessor, the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) and the tribunal service led to her being denied the support she needed to stay safe and live independently over the last 18 months.It comes as Disability News Service continues its investigation into claims of widespread dishonesty by PIP assessors working for both Capita and Atos on behalf of DWP.Kennedy says the decision to deny her PIP claim meant: that she had to take redundancy from her job as a university sociology lecturer, partly because she could not afford to travel to work in central and west London without a blue parking badge; that she has suffered further injuries because of the lack of support; and that she has found it more difficult to care for her adult disabled daughter.Since her PIP claim was rejected in 2015, the lack of financial support has led to three serious falls, which caused further serious impairment; multiple lesser falls, where she has still been hurt; and many other potentially dangerous “trips, slips and stumbles”.Kennedy says the Atos paramedic who assessed her was guilty of “serious omissions and errors of fact and reasoning” in the report he compiled after a face-to-face assessment at her home in October 2015.Among those omissions and errors were that he “played down” her impairments, failed to record that she had been suffering frequent falls for “some years”, despite being told this “at length” in the assessment, and omitted other “vital information” in his assessment report.But she is also highly critical of the way that the first-tier social security tribunal dealt with her appeal against being denied PIP in September 2016.She says the first-tier tribunal was openly “sceptical” and “hostile” to her during her appeal; failed to listen to her when she was reading her statement; repeatedly interrupted when she tried to answer their questions; and “almost constantly made facial expressions of contemptuous disbelief in response to the comprehensive answers I gave to their questions”.She also claims that one of the tribunal members fell asleep when she was reading out her statement.Last month, the upper tribunal denied her permission to appeal against the decision of the first-tier tribunal.Now she is asking the high court to carry out a judicial review of the way that her case has been dealt with by Atos, DWP and the tribunal service.Her application was due to be submitted by tomorrow (Friday).Kennedy said: “Serious errors and omissions were made at all levels of the claims and appeals process. “This application for judicial review therefore has important ramifications for the handling of other PIP claims.“My case is particularly important because of the huge amount, intensity, and seriousness of all the errors of procedure, facts and reasoning that have been made.”A spokesman for the Judicial Office declined to comment because the case was pending a possible judicial review.last_img read more

Labour MP Siobhain McDonagh said there was a link

first_imgLabour MP Siobhain McDonagh said there was a link between antisemitism and the anti-capitalist beliefs of ‘hard left’ Labour members during a Radio 4 interview this morning.Asked by John Humphrys whether she believed the Labour Party was taking antisemitism “properly seriously”, McDonagh replied: “I’m not sure that some people in the Labour Party can.“Because it’s very much part of their politics, of hard left politics, to be against capitalists and to see Jewish people as the financiers of capital. Ergo you are anti-Jewish people.Humphrys followed up: “In other words, to be anti-capitalist you have to be antisemitic?”“Yes,” the Labour MP said. “Not everybody, but there is a certain… there’s a certain strand of it. These people are not Labour, have never been Labour, but we now find them in our party.”McDonagh also commented on the row between deputy leader Tom Watson and general secretary Jennie Formby, which centres on the accusation that Watson wants to set up a “vague parallel complaints monitoring system”.“Anybody who wants reassurance and wants his help can go to [Watson]. It’s interesting that she regards that as not a legitimate offer, and has tried to slap him down in the most rude way,” the MP for Mitcham and Morden said.Tags:Labour /Antisemitism /Siobhain McDonagh /last_img read more

San Jalisco – an oldie and a goodie

first_img… and apparently not having learned my lesson the first time, I ordered an appetizer: queso fundido (literally, “melted cheese”)…Queso fundido. But the posole! Ay dios mio! Tender chunks of pork swam in a richly colored, deeply flavorful red chili broth, flanked by a dish of cabbage, radishes, limes, and chopped raw onion for table-top enhancement. Excellent. However, instead of getting the typical red or green sauce, he let the server talk him into the mole. Now, the mole here is delicious in its own right, but it was a bit of an odd pairing, to us, with the carne asada. It was sweet, chocolatey and clove-forward, and it overwhelmed all the other flavors in the burrito. It wasn’t bad, just not what he expected.As it was cold and rainy again on this second visit, I just had to order their best-selling sopa de res – beef soup.Sopa de res.As you can see, this behemoth of a bowl practically brims over with veggies – corn on the cob, potatoes, zucchini, carrots, tomatoes, cabbage, and green beans – and good chunks of beef, usually beef shank, which makes a very rich broth – and is served with pico de gallo, cut lemon and lime, and a bit of rice on the side so it doesn’t expand too much in the delicious broth. Served with more sopping-up tortillas, this was another homey, warming bowl of tummy love. This is the kinds of dish your abuelita would have made you when you had the sniffles, and you would have been better in 12 hours!Of course, I was full from the queso, so 99.9% of the soup came home with us. Again, we could easily have split one of these dishes and been quite satisfied, the portions are so enormous. The BF said that they’d definitely won him over this time. I’m glad, because the menu is extensive, and we’ve barely scratched the surface.San Jalisco has been around forever (in one incarnation or another), and it seems that as long as this family keeps going, they will remain here forever. To help ensure that, in this day when institutions routinely get booted by greedy landlords, the Padilla-Reyes family bought the building the restaurant is housed in. From an old photograph over the counter area, Mamá Anita y Papá Vicente beam down upon you as if to say, “We’re not going anywhere.”Read more Mission Local Restaurant Reviews here. San Jalisco901 S. Van Ness Ave. @ 20thSan Francisco, CA 94110(415) 648-8383http://m.sanjalisco.com/ Served with their fantastically corny, homemade tortillas for sopping and scooping, it was the perfect dish for a cold night. I’d get this again for sure.The BF had ordered a combo plate (“Combinación Tres Colores”) of three items for himself, still unaware that we had the mother of all sampler platters coming.Tres Colores – Chile relleno, beef tostada and a chicken enchilada. What we didn’t know was that the dish came with two of each item! We could have split just this plate for dinner and been utterly stuffed. Everything was tasty, but just too much – palate fatigue was achieved quite early in the evening. I did, however, especially like the potato tacos, and the mole was scrumptious. The sope was drowned under everything else and rather a soggy mess by the time we got to it – yet still managed to be a little tough to eat.For my meal, I was torn between the sopa de res (beef soup) and the posole with pork chili colorado – two of the handwritten specials. The server made my choice easy as she said they had run out of the beef soup – it’s a very popular item here, and they sell it every day. I was actually advised to call ahead next time I want it and they could put aside a bowl for me!Pozole con pork colorado. San Jalisco started out as the New Central Café, in the 50s, located on 14th Street, one of two restaurants Anita and Vicente Padilla opened once they established themselves here from Mexico. Owned by the Padilla-Reyes family, they’ve been at their current location on South Van Ness since 1988, with current chef/owner Josie Padilla-Reyes having taken over cooking duties from her father.The restaurant was for a time called Los Jarritos – meaning “little clay pots,” of which there are many on display in this brightly colored and cheerful traditional Mexican restaurant. But a soda company by the same name forced them to change it, and the family decided on San Jalisco as a nod to both areas – San Francisco, CA, and Jalisco, Mexico – from where they hale. Our server on our first visit was Chef Josie’s niece. Another server in the dining room turned out to be her mother, and has been working in the family business since she was 5! This is truly a family affair! You don’t get much more old school than this.One of the restaurant’s dishes of fame is birria – goat. I must admit that I came to San Jalisco several years ago – I didn’t remember it was the same place because at the time it was called Los Jarritos – and ordered one of the goat dishes, but found it dry. The BF had a gigantic burrito that he wasn’t pleased with, so we hadn’t returned. But I’m glad we did.On our first night, a standard order of warm chips and salsa came to the table. We each had an ice-cold Bohemia in a frosty mug to start.center_img 0% I’d only ever had the Velveeta version with some chopped ortegas and chips. San Jalisco’s was made with creamy Monterey Jack, and studded with grilled mushrooms, strips of nopales (cactus), and pico de gallo, and served with those great tortillas. Delicious! Like scraping off the top of a super melty cheese and mushroom pizza – in a very good way.El BF decided to test the fates and ordered a burrito – this time, a mojado (“wet,” which means they pour enchilada sauce over the burrito and top it with cheese).Burrito mojado. Chile relleno, chicken enchilada in red sauce, and a beef tostada, with rice and beans and salad. Oof! Once again, everything was rather haphazardly place atop each other, and so it was difficult to discern one flavor from the next, but if you managed to get a bite of one item alone, each was quite tasty. I especially loved the chile relleno – the perfect combo of eggy cheesiness. The rice and beans were pretty standard. The beef tostada especially suffered from being suffocated underneath everything else, but once we unearthed it, the meat itself had great flavor. Needless to say, the BF barely made a dent in his dish, and we took most of it home.On our second visit, we sat in the Frida Kahlo/Diego Rivera alcove. Loved all the artwork here, and the bright colors of this room.Frida alcove. Warm chips are always welcome (though some of these were a bit hard), and their salsa is quite fiery. A plus!The BF had the big idea of ordering the El Trio – a sampler plate of appetizers consisting of a chicken flauta in a sweet mole, a fried crispy taco stuffed with mashed potatoes, and a vegetarian sope.Chicken flautas in sweet mole, potato purée tacos, vegetarian sopes. Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%last_img read more

THE Magic of the Cup is something all Rugby League

first_imgTHE Magic of the Cup is something all Rugby League fans can relate to.Whether it’s memories of watching the famous wins of 1961 and 66, Bobbie’s Bombs in 96, the victory over Wigan at the Millennium Stadium in 2004 or the treble of 2006, 07 – the first at the new Wembley – and 08 – everyone has a special place for the Ladbrokes Challenge Cup.And it affects our overseas players too – as Travis Burns explains in the build-up to Saints’ Quarter Final with Widnes this Sunday at Langtree Park (4pm).“I’d get up early to watch the cup on TV back home – it was always something to look forward to. Early in my career it wasn’t shown too much, but later on I saw a bunch of games.“Playing in the NRL, it was a big competition that you would be envious of not playing in and it would be good to have something similar back home.“I hold the Challenge Cup in the highest regard, it’s got a lot of history, a lot of great players have won the trophy and a lot of great coaches have coached great teams.“I remember some big upsets; you never know what can happen in the Challenge Cup. When I was at Hull KR they talked about beating Warrington when they were in the Division below. So anything can happen in the Challenge Cup, it’s one of those exciting times of the year and I’m looking forward to playing in it.”He continues: “I’ve love to play in a Challenge Cup Final. It’s something that I’m always looking at, I’ve had a long career in the NRL, I’ve been over here a few years now too and haven’t made it very far in the Challenge Cup, so that’s something I’m looking forward to, something to cherish.“We’ve got new players at the club, but the players who have been around for a while and who have won it speak highly of the Challenge Cup and I’d love to add my name to the list of winners.”Tickets are on sale from the Ticket Office at Langtree Park, by calling 01744 455 052 or going to www.saintssuperstore.comThe sides will meet on Sunday June 28 at 4pm.Ticket prices are: Hatton’s Solicitors West Stand: Adults £15, Concessions £12, Juniors £5 with Junior Season Ticket Holders free.Totally Wicked North and Solarking South Stands: Adults £18, Concessions £14, Juniors £5 with Junior Season Ticket Holders free.last_img read more

JAMES ROBY and Alex Walmsley have been named in th

first_imgJAMES ROBY and Alex Walmsley have been named in the 2015 First Utility Super League Dream Team.It is the mercurial number 9s fifth induction into the elite side – whilst Walmsley appears for the first time.The Super League Dream Team is selected by a panel of the sport’s broadcasters and journalists in a secret ballot and represents the form team of the First Utility Super League season.The 2015 First Utility Super League Dream Team is as follows:1. Zak Hardaker (Leeds Rhinos) Dream Team appearances: 2 (2014, 2015)2. Jermaine McGillvary (Huddersfield Giants) Dream Team appearances: 1 (2015)3. Kallum Watkins (Leeds Rhinos) Dream Team appearances: 2 (2014, 2015)4. Michael Shenton (Castleford Tigers) Dream Team appearances: 2 (2014, 2015)5. Joe Burgess (Wigan Warriors) Dream Team appearances: 1 (2015)6. Danny Brough (Huddersfield Giants) Dream Team appearances: 2 (2013, 2015)7. Luke Gale (Castleford Tigers) Dream Team appearances: 1 (2015)8. Alex Walmsley (St Helens) Dream Team appearances: 1 (2015)9. James Roby (St Helens) Dream Team appearances: 5 (2007, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2015)10. Jamie Peacock (Leeds Rhinos) Dream Team appearances: 11 (2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2013, 2014, 2015)11. Zeb Taia (Catalans Dragons) Dream Team appearances: 1 (2015)12. Liam Farrell (Wigan Warriors) Dream Team appearances: 1 (2015)13. Adam Cuthbertson (Leeds Rhinos) Dream Team appearances: 1 (2015)last_img read more

RUGBY League fans who watched the game in the 1950

first_imgRUGBY League fans who watched the game in the 1950s and 1960s were well aware of the tremendous ability of Mick Sullivan at club and representative level, writes Alex Service.Apart from speed, the essential prerequisite for any successful winger, he was a real hard man too, with what could only be described as downright aggressive defence! It is, therefore, sad to report his passing in Dewsbury at the age of 82. He had been unwell for some time.Born in Pudsey, West Yorkshire, on January 12 1934, Mick first tasted rugby league success with the famous Shaw Cross Boys’ Club in Dewsbury, where Lee Gilmour played in a later era. He began his professional career with Huddersfield, making his debut against Dewsbury in a 21-6 victory at Crown Flatt. He scored two tries and that was the trigger for one of the most prolific careers in the thirteen-a-side code.The flying Sullivan became a World Cup winner at the age of 20, in 1954, making his debut against Australia in Lyon. He went on to set a record for the most Great Britain caps, with 46 – a record later equalled by Garry Schofield. Mick also won his second World Cup in 1960, the only British player to win the competition twice. In all, he scored 120 tries in 102 representative games for Great Britain, England and Yorkshire – a fantastic achievement!His try-scoring exploits for Huddersfield [117 appearances 93 tries] attracted big-spending Wigan and he joined the Riversiders in 1957 for a world record £9,500 fee. He went on to play at Wembley with Wigan in two Challenge Cup finals [1958 and 1959] before he was on the move again, this time crossing the Rubicon to Knowsley Road in another sensational transfer saga, just before the Challenge Cup deadline in January 1961.It took the Saints’ Board another record £11,000 to secure his services and by the end of the season he had won another Challenge Cup winner’s medal in that epic Wembley encounter with the club he left behind. St. Helens won 12-6 on a baking-hot afternoon and one of the great individual contests of that game was Sully against his former team-mate Billy Boston. Indeed, that three-quarter line remains one of Saints’ most memorable in the red vee: van Vollenhoven, Large, McGinn and Sullivan.Mick went on to win two Lancashire Cup finals with the Saints and although his overall try-scoring tally during his three seasons at Knowsley Road, 31 in 82 matches, was relatively modest compared to his early days, he was still a hugely popular figure with the supporters. In the match against Huddersfield, at Knowsley Road, on February 3 1962, he rolled back the years and ran riot, with five scintillating touchdowns.Brian McGinn was his centre too, with Dick Huddart unusually partnering Tom van Vollenhoven on the other flank. His last match as a Saint was on the left wing against Oldham, at Watersheddings, on May 30 1963. Sully signed off with a try and his centre was Wigan-born Mick Mooney.Former Saints’ great Austin Rhodes remains a huge admirer of Sullivan’s ability in his pomp: “One of the greatest players of the 1950s. I remember him as a team-mate during the 1957 World Cup with Great Britain and he was brilliant. I played against him when he was with Huddersfield and in one particular match he scored two tries and went round Glyn Moses as though he was a statue and that wasn’t an easy thing to do. Mind you, he could do that against most full-backs at the time.”Mick joined York and then became Player-Coach of Dewsbury. It is almost fifty years ago [April 16 1966] when his Dewsbury side gave Saints a real fight in the Challenge Cup semi-final at Swinton, losing 12 points to 5, when an exasperated Minnie Cotton came on to the field! Mick was loose forward that day and, probably, it was our last memory of him. Mick went on to coach in Australia [June] and eventually he was inducted into the prestigious Rugby League Hall of Fame.No-one deserved it more and we send our condolences to Mick’s family at this sad time.last_img read more

Organisers are aiming to draw in record crowds at

first_imgOrganisers are aiming to draw in record crowds at the 2021 tournament – tipped to be the biggest one yet – which is expected to boost St Helens’ economy by around £3.6m, and benefit the grassroots game through legacy projects.This morning (Tuesday 29 January) St Helens Council Leader Derek Long was among those in attendance at a launch event in Manchester to hear Saints’ 18,000 capacity Totally Wicked Stadium – considered by many to be the best purpose-built club rugby stadium in the country – confirmed as one of 16 host venues, following over 75 applications from towns and cities across the country.The council, together with Saints, officially submitted the borough’s host bid in July 2018 during half-time of Saints’ nail-biting 14-12 win over Warrington Wolves, with organisers highly commending St Helens’ claim at each stage of the bidding leading up to today’s successful announcement. Welcoming the news, St Helens Council Leader Derek Long said: “Rugby League is in the DNA of St Helens which is why I made successfully bidding to be a host venue a priority in my very first week in office as leader. “Hosting Australia against Fiji in 2013 showed the world how welcoming St Helens is as a host for a major sporting event and now that we’ve secured three matches – two more than last time – we hope to see even more people visit the borough in 2021. “The economic impact and community benefits that can be obtained are equally as important as the hosting of matches and this great news will now allow us to get on with maximising the overall benefit.“England will be in this tournament to win it and I think the entire borough will be with me in backing that effort.”Eamonn McManus, chairman of both St.Helens R.F.C. and the St Helens Economy Board, added: “This is a huge statement of the ambition and status of both the borough of St Helens and of its world famous rugby league club, which benefit in equal measure. The Saints are the principal ambassador for our town and hosting three games for the 2021 Rugby League World Cup is a testament both to the club and to the Invest in St Helens programme, of which we are a major supporter.” RLWC2021 Chief Executive, Jon Dutton, said: “St Helens is a rugby league stronghold and we’re incredibly excited to be bringing the pinnacle of the men’s game to the town through the Rugby League World Cup 2021. “With fantastic facilities and a community that has rugby league at its heart, we have awarded St Helens three men’s group games and look forward to developing a plan around the community adopting a team and bringing this to life through as vibrant local legacy programme”.Initial discussions with tournament organisers resulted in the possibility of the borough also hosting a team throughout the duration of the World Cup, using Ruskin Drive Sports Village and Saints’ training base at Cowley Language College as training bases. A decision on this is yet to be made.The news will also be announced locally during half-time of Thursday evening’s Super League season opener between Saints and Wigan Warriors at the Totally Wicked Stadium.last_img read more

Sheriffs Office Man wanted for breaking into Shallotte home

first_img Anyone with information should contact Det. Hester at ‭910-713-8360‬. Man wanted for allegedly breaking into Shallotte home. (Photo: BCSO) BRUNSWICK COUNTY, NC (WWAY) — Does this man look familiar? Detectives with the Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office Criminal Investigations Unit are asking for your help in identifying him.The man is suspected of breaking into a home on Bluebird Trail in Shallotte sometime between February 15 and March 16.- Advertisement – last_img

GREAT STRIDES A familys story with Cystic Fibrosis

first_img There are thousands of families that care for a family member who is a patient with CF. One of them is the Shaw family.Their son IV’s diagnosis was unlike many patients with CF.“We went to the doctor and said there’s something wrong and they couldn’t figure it out and I think my wife probably self-diagnosed IV quicker that the hospitals did. You know just by way of Google. And somehow stumbled upon Cystic Fibrosis,” said CT Shaw, IV’s father. “She even mentioned it to the doctor. They referred us to Chapel Hill. That’s where we went and they did the sweat test and that’s when we figured out six months into his life that he had Cystic Fibrosis and that he needed to be on the enzymes to absorb the nutrients.”Related Article: Walmart expanding pickup tower service in Cape FearIt was a phone call, that many parents have received and still remember.“We got the call later that day before we made it back here to Leland that IV has Cystic Fibrosis,”said Shaw, “As a parent you can hear that phone call as I sit here and think about it. From that minute on things changed but we decided pretty early within a week that we were going to be grateful for what it wasn’t versus what it was.”That call came more than six years ago. IV was diagnosed with CF containing two gene mutations of the F Delta 508 gene.“One of my questions to the doctors when they first diagnosed him, diagnosed IV with Cystic Fibrosis is what does that mean,” asked Shaw. “Does everybody that has Cystic Fibrosis have the same Cystic Fibrosis? His words to me were, IV will write his own book. Or IV will write his own story.”IV was the Shaw’s second child. CT says his older sister prepared them for another child, but everything changed with the diagnosis.“Every morning he wakes up to a vest,” said Shaw. “He’s taking Orkambi in the morning and at night. He’s doing inhalers and then his typical consumption of enzymes before he eats breakfast but that’s pretty much it in the morning just the vest treatment and the inhaler and all of those pills, I would say one, two, seven, eight pills before breakfast.”Shaw says by the end of the day, IV will take nearly 30 pills to help him maintain weight and fight off other afflictions as a result of his CF. The Shaws’ story though is not one of consistent defense of the disease, but consistent living alongside it and besides the fact of it.“As far as activities, outdoor activities and sports our thing is soccer, which I get to coach him, tennis he does tennis every week, and they’re a little fascinated with golf he and his sister and I think that has to go with me watching golf every Sunday being in the golf business,” said Shaw.The Shaws are one of the most active CF families in the Cape Fear. Whether it’s mom, Holly, taking to the radio airwaves to promote events for fundraising, to them watching their son run, surf, and tee off at the many CF fundraisers they take part in.The Shaws host a series of fundraisers including the Four IV invitational that takes place each fall.“It’s certainly not my mission to I don’t know have people feel pity towards the Shaw family or IV or those with Cystic Fibrosis, but it is nice, I’d like for people to know if they choose they will be a part of something that I think is going to be miraculous in the way that be a part of a cure,” said Shaw. LELAND, NC (WWAY) – This week we are highlighting families who day in day out work to combat Cystic Fibrosis (CF). WWAY is doing this to show you the lifestyles of those who have loved ones with the genetic disease.IV at clinicPHOTO: Shaw FamilyYou can learn more about CF’s side affects and symptoms here.- Advertisement – last_img read more

Uber to launch UberEats in 22 new countries

first_imgAdvertisement Uber is set to aggressively expand its food delivery service across Europe, the Middle East and Africa with UberEats.Financial Times reports that UberEats, the takeaway delivery arm of Uber, will launch in European cities including Amsterdam, Brussels and Stockholm, as well as farther afield in Dubai and Johannesburg. The company is also advertising for UberEats general manager roles in countries including Germany, Spain, Italy, Switzerland, Austria and Denmark.According to market research firm Euromonitor, the global restaurant takeaway market is projected to grow by 10 percent between 2015 and 2020 to reach $93.4 billion. – Advertisement – In July, Uber started testing UberEats in Nigeria and Kenya with UberIceCream. In Kenya, Uber partnered with Delia’s All Natural Ice Cream to deliver Uber’s uniquely labelled dessert called “Bits and Atoms” while in Nigeria Uber partnered with Hans and Rene to deliver premium and indulgent ice cream scoops.An UberEATS food delivery courier rides her scooter in London. Credit: REUTERSRelated, Amazon earlier this month launched its international expansion of Amazon Restaurants by entering the London market, building on its existing 11-city base in the United States.[related-posts]last_img read more

BENS BLOG Thank you Lukey

first_img‎[dropcap]C[/dropcap]heltenham is a huge team effort for The Star Army. And one of our leading soldiers, is long standing PR man, Luke Tarr (pictured above left). His whole year is planned around the big week, and of course, Royal Ascot.I’ve only locked horns with Lukey, I’d say, roughly, about 3,000 times, but I will say this: he is a REAL trier. If he turned up at Ascot, in a shell-suit and trainers, and I told him that the best Punter of all-time, was in a private box, in the members enclosure; he would get in there to speak to the guy. Yes, he would. Nothing stops him, when he’s got the bit between his teeth.This year, Luke has organised no less than 30 Star preview evenings, right across the British Isles. And he’s done the firm proud. THANK YOU, LUKEY.In other news:When I was in my teens I started doing work experience with as many bookmakers as possible. And, at the time, spread-betting giant City Index operated a sports-betting department. Working there, was the now poker guru, betting-expert, and true character; Neil Channing. ‘Dot’ as he was always known, spent hours showing me how to price markets up, and also took me racing, where he bet fearlessly, on-course, from a pitch in the back line. He really was very kind and has been known to be so, to many up and coming people in the game.Despite the fact though that Neil’s even madder than me, he is actually a very good judge and spends hours on end studying the form. So much so, that he’s now started a tipping-service, that offers a page of analysis, on every race at the Festival. He tells me that subscribers have won a fortune over the last three years, so maybe you, Blog, should be checking him out too. www.bettingemporium.com. I CERTAINLY WOULDN’T BE LAYING HIM..!Over and out, B xlast_img read more

BENS BLOG All IndependentBookmakers MUST Take This Chance

first_img[dropcap]S[/dropcap]o, it looks like, at long, long last, as if the Ladbrokes and Corals merger, is now going to go through. And because of this, there will be 450 shops, available for sale. Remember, this isn’t just the crap they want to get rid of. Very often, these will be some of the best positions, where there is a concentration of outlets, in very busy betting areas.Yes, Paddy and Fred will be first in the queue. We all know that. BUT, there will still be many shops, right around the country, that neither will be able to take, because they too, would then be in breach of competition rules. There isn’t a space in our land that the shop-location teams at the Firms don’t know about. This is a once in a lifetime opportunity, for the independent bookmaker, to play a shot, and get some quality betting-shops.This, my Blog….is a call to arms. ATTACK. ATTACK. ATTACK..!!‎!In other news:Look at these fabulous triers. Getting absolutely stuck in, only thinking about how they can get their job done. And with such a great attitude, to boot. ‎I BET THEY DON’T MOAN ABOUT THEIR RAAHTS AND ENTAHAWMINTS..! (Kindly supplied by my ladyfriend; Belindabelle)Over and out, B xlast_img read more

STARTERS ORDERS Tues Movers Specials

first_imgHORSE RACING2.45 ExeterAmzac Magic 13/2 > 7/23.40 PunchestownFestival Opera 33/1 > 11/14.15 BrightonOcean Temptress 8/1 > 4/15.10 HuntingdonSimonia 6/1 > 5/25.30 PunchestownDouvan 6/5 > 5/6LIVE FOOTBALLUEFA Champions League Semi-Final 1st Leg19:45 BT Sport 2 / BT Sport 4K UHD1/2 Liverpool 11/2 Roma 15/4 DRAWChampionship19:45 Sky Sports Football / Sky Sports Main Event17/10 Derby County 6/4 Cardiff City 23/10 DRAWBET NOW starsports.bet or 08000 521 321 Welcome to Starters Orders. Our daily midday update from the trading room at Star Sports with our key market movers for the day across all sports.Tuesday 24 AprilDAILY SPECIALSBET NOW starsports.bet or 08000 521 321last_img read more

Environmental Cleanup Focus of Symposium

first_img CONTACT: Lia Unrau PHONE: (713)831-4793 E-MAIL: var addthis_product = ‘wpp-262’;var addthis_config = {“data_track_clickback”:true,”data_ga_property”:”UA-2249859-1″,”data_ga_social”:true,”data_track_addressbar”:false,”ui_508_compliant”:true};if (typeof(addthis_share) == “undefined”){ addthis_share = [];}AddThis ShareMedia Advisorylast_img

Zebrafish research points way to answers about human development

first_imgShareCONTACT: Jade BoydPHONE: 713-348-6778E-MAIL: jadeboyd@rice.eduIt’s not your parents’ lab ratZebrafish research points way to answers about human developmentZebrafish cost about a dollar at the pet store. They grow from eggs to hunting their own food in three days. Adults can lay up to 500 eggs at once… and you have more in common with them than you think.“For all their differences, humans and zebrafish aren’t that dissimilar,” said Rice University zebrafish expert Mary Ellen Lane. “For every zebrafish gene we isolate, there is a related gene in humans.”In her most recent work, Lane, graduate students Catherine McCollum and Shivas Amin, and undergraduate Philip Pauerstein zeroed in on a gene called LMO4 that’s known to play roles in both cell reproduction and in breast cancer. Using the tools of biotechnology, the team studied zebrafish that couldn’t transcribe the LMO4 gene, and they observed marked enlargement in both the forebrain and optical portions of the embryos. When they overexpressed the LMO4 gene, making more protein than normal, those same areas shrank. The study will appear later this year in the journal Developmental Biology.“The study suggests that LMO4 independently regulates two other genes that promote growth in those areas of the embryo,” said Lane, assistant professor of biochemistry and cell biology. “It fills in another piece of the bigger picture of what’s going on during neurological development.”Zebrafish — like rats and fruit flies before them — are becoming regular contributors on research ranging from cancer to cocaine addiction. For example, zebrafish were used a landmark 2005 study that led scientists to the human gene that regulates skin color.Lane’s zebrafish studies explore one the major unexplained areas in developmental biology — how the brain and central nervous system develop. It helps that zebrafish embryos grow from just a single cell to having a forebrain, hindbrain, spinal column and eye within a scant 24 hours. It also helps that the embryos are transparent and develop outside their mothers’ bodies — and can thus been seen under a microscope at every step of their development.“It’s a beautiful organism for experiment,” Lane said. “It develops in a very regular way, so any abnormality is easy to spot, even for undergraduates with only a few days training.”Lane established Rice’s zebrafish program six years ago. She said the program got a major boost in 2003 when fellow zebrafish researcher Dan Wagner joined the BCB faculty. Most recently, Wagner and Lane won funding from Rice’s Faculty Initiatives Fund to hire a research scientist to oversee collaborative research with partners in the Texas Medical Center.Wagner and Lane’s facility — which houses 18,000 zebrafish and employs a full-time fish caretaker — is capable of supporting more joint projects with TMC researchers, Wagner said. The problem has been lack of staff.“The seed funding from the administration will allow us to hire a qualified researcher who’s dedicated to overseeing these collaborative programs,” Wagner said. “The interest from the medical center has always been there, and we believe this will allow us to build a self-sustaining program that will, in time, attract plenty of outside funding.” AddThislast_img read more

Could biology be to blame for the US government shutdown

first_imgShareAmy Hodges713-348-6777amy.hodges@rice.edu Could biology be to blame for the US government shutdown?Rice political scientist suggests individuals are biologically ‘hardwired’ to be either liberal or conservativeHOUSTON — (Oct. 4, 2013) — As the U.S. government remains shut down for a fourth day, Rice University political scientist John Alford is available to discuss how biology may be to blame for the current political impasse in the nation’s capital.Alford, an associate professor of political science, specializes in research of the biology of political behavior, including brain science, genetics and the role of evolution in shaping human political beliefs. In his new book, “Predisposed: Liberals, Conservatives and the Biology of Political Differences,” Alford and his coauthors argue that the “universal rift” between conservatives and liberals endures not because of societal or familial influences, but because people have diverse psychological, physiological and genetic traits.These biological differences influence much of what makes people who they are, including their orientation to politics, Alford said.“It is our biology, and not always reason or the careful consideration of facts, that predisposes us to see and understand the world in different ways,” Alford said. “These predispositions are in turn responsible for noteworthy moments of political and ideological conflict that mark human history.”Alford said the key to getting along politically is not the ability of one side to see the error of its ways but rather the ability of each side to see that the other is different, not just politically, but physically.For more information or to schedule an interview with Alford, contact Amy Hodges, senior media relations specialist at Rice, at 713-348-6777 or amy.hodges@rice.edu.-30-This news release can be found online at http://news-network.rice.edu/news.Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews.Related materials:John Alford bio: http://politicalscience.rice.edu/Content.aspx?id=56 “Predisposed: Liberals, Conservatives and the Biology of Political Differences”: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415535878/ Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,708 undergraduates and 2,374 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice has been ranked No. 1 for best quality of life multiple times by the Princeton Review and No. 2 for “best value” among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to http://tinyurl.com/AboutRiceU.If you do not wish to receive news releases from Rice University, reply to this email and write “unsubscribe” in the subject line. Office of News and Media Relations – MS 300, Rice University, 6100 Main St., Houston, TX 77005 FacebookTwitterPrintEmailAddThislast_img read more

Rice MBA for Executives rises to top 10 in the US

first_imgShareDavid Ruth713-348-6327druth@rice.eduJeff Falk713-348-6775jfalk@rice.edu Rice MBA for Executives rises to top 10 in the USJones Graduate School of Business program is No. 1 in Texas, the SouthwestHOUSTON – (Oct. 23, 2013) – Rice University’s Master of Business Administration for Executives (EMBA) is still on top in the state and region, according to new rankings from the Financial Times. For the fourth year in a row, the Jones Graduate School of Business program designed for upper-level managers was ranked No. 1 in Texas and the Southwest. It was ranked No. 8 in the U.S. (up from No. 11 last year).Globally, the Financial Times ranked the Rice EMBA 39th, up seven spots from 46th in 2012.“The updated rankings from Financial Times once again recognize our successful improvements in the metrics that matter most to our stakeholders,” said Bill Glick, dean and the H. Joe Nelson III Professor of Management. “As 55 percent of the weight in this ranking comes from our alumni themselves, I am pleased that we are providing the academic leadership and education that yields a No. 1 ranking in entrepreneurship globally and a No. 2 ranking in the U.S. for average percent salary increase from matriculation to three-years postgraduation. This average percent salary increase for our EMBA graduates is consistent with our No. 1 U.S. ranking on percent salary increase for our full-time program graduates. Our alumni excel at performing on the job to create value and earn these rewards. The market clearly recognizes the value of the Rice MBA.”Among U.S. EMBA programs, the faculty research rank was No. 15. In the specialty categories, the Rice EMBA program ranked No. 1 globally in entrepreneurship, as rated by 2010 graduates.Rice’s EMBA program is designed for business leaders with 10 or more years of experience and allows students to focus on management, thought leadership and business strategy without interrupting their careers. The rigorous 22-month program features innovative classes, expert faculty and a diverse group of classmates who will become colleagues for a lifetime.According to Glick, the most recent students entering the Rice EMBA program are employed in several industries, including energy, finance and health care, as well as the legal and military sectors.The Jones Graduate School of Business is consistently recognized by several rankings publications for its programs, including the Rice MBA, Rice MBA for Executives and Rice MBA for Professionals. For more information on Rice MBA programs, visit http://business.rice.eduFor more information about the Financial Times rankings, see http://rankings.ft.com/businessschoolrankings/emba-ranking-2013.For more information on the Jones School, visit http://business.rice.edu/future.-30-Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews.Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,708 undergraduates and 2,374 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice has been ranked No. 1 for best quality of life multiple times by the Princeton Review and No. 2 for “best value” among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to http://tinyurl.com/AboutRiceU.  AddThislast_img read more

Study Early organic carbon got deep burial in mantle

first_imgAddThis Share4David Ruth713-348-6327david@rice.eduJade Boyd713-348-6778jadeboyd@rice.eduStudy: Early organic carbon got deep burial in mantlePetrology experiments support tectonic role in Earth’s ‘great oxidation event’HOUSTON — (April 25, 2017) — Rice University petrologists who recreated hot, high-pressure conditions from 60 miles below Earth’s surface have found a new clue about a crucial event in the planet’s deep past.Earth’s atmosphere, as seen in 2003 from the International Space Station, hasn’t always contained large amounts of oxygen. Petrologists from Rice University and the Carnegie Institution recreated hot, high-pressure conditions from 60 miles below Earth’s surface in search of new clues about the “great oxidation event” that added large amounts of oxygen to the atmosphere around 2.4 billion years ago. (Photo courtesy of ISS Expedition 7 Crew, EOL, NASA)Their study describes how fossilized carbon — the remains of Earth’s earliest single-celled creatures — could have been subsumed and locked deep in Earth’s interior starting around 2.4 billion years ago — a time when atmospheric oxygen rose dramatically. The paper appears online this week in the journal Nature Geoscience.“It’s an interesting concept, but in order for complex life to evolve, the earliest form of life needed to be deeply buried in the planet’s mantle,” said Rajdeep Dasgupta, a professor of Earth science at Rice. “The mechanism for that burial comes in two parts. First, you need some form of plate tectonics, a mechanism to carry the carbon remains of early life-forms back into Earth. Second, you need the correct geochemistry so that organic carbon can be carried deeply into Earth’s interior and thereby removed from the surface environment for a long time.”At issue is what caused the “great oxidation event,” a steep increase in atmospheric oxygen that is well-documented in countless ancient rocks. The event is so well-known to geologists that they often simply refer to it as the “GOE.” But despite this familiarity, there’s no scientific consensus about what caused the GOE. For example, scientists know Earth’s earliest known life, single-celled cyanobacteria, drew down carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and released oxygen. But the appearance of early life has been pushed further and further into the past with recent fossil discoveries, and scientists now know that cyanobacteria were prevalent at least 500 million years before the GOE.Megan Duncan (Photo by Jeff Fitlow/Rice University)“Cyanobacteria may have played a role, but the GOE was so dramatic — oxygen concentration increased as much as 10,000 times — that cyanobacteria by themselves could not account for it,” said lead co-author Megan Duncan, who conducted the research for her Ph.D. dissertation at Rice. “There also has to be a mechanism to remove a significant amount of reduced carbon from the biosphere, and thereby shift the relative concentration of oxygen within the system,” she said.Removing carbon without removing oxygen requires special circumstances because the two elements are prone to bind with one another. They form one of the key components of the atmosphere — carbon dioxide — as well as all types of carbonate rocks.Dasgupta and Duncan found that the chemical composition of the “silicate melt” — subducting crustal rock that melts and rises back to the surface through volcanic eruptions — plays a crucial role in determining whether fossilized organic carbon, or graphite, sinks into the mantle or rises back to the surface through volcanism.This schematic depicts the efficient deep subduction of organic (reduced) carbon, a process that could have locked significant amounts of carbon in Earth’s mantle and resulted in a higher percentage of atmospheric oxygen. Based on new high-pressure, high-temperature experiments, Rice University petrologists argue that the long-term sequestration of organic carbon from this process began as early as 2.5 billion years ago and helped bring about a well-known buildup of oxygen in Earth’s atmosphere — the “Great Oxidation Event” — about 2.4 billion years ago. (Image courtesy of R. Dasgupta/Rice University)Duncan, now a research scientist at the Carnegie Institution in Washington, D.C., said the study is the first to examine the graphite-carrying capacity of a type of melt known as rhyolite, which is commonly produced deep in the mantle and carries significant amounts of carbon to the volcanoes. She said the graphite-carrying capacity of rhyolitic rock is crucial because if graphite is prone to hitching a ride back to the surface via extraction of rhyolitic melt, it would not have been buried in sufficient quantities to account for the GOE.“Silicate composition plays an important role,” she said. “Scientists have previously looked at carbon-carrying capacities in compositions that were much more magnesium-rich and silicon-poor. But the compositions of these rhyolitic melts are high in silicon and aluminum and have very little calcium, magnesium and iron. That matters because calcium and magnesium are cations, and they change the amount of carbon you can dissolve.”Dasgupta and Duncan found that rhyolitic melts could dissolve very little graphite, even when very hot.“That was one of our motivations,” said Dasgupta, professor of Earth science. “If subduction zones in the past were very hot and produced a substantial amount of melt, could they completely destabilize organic carbon and release it back to the surface?“What we showed was that even at very, very high temperatures, not much of this graphitic carbon dissolves in the melt,” he said. “So even though the temperature is high and you produce a lot of melt, this organic carbon is not very soluble in that melt, and the carbon gets buried in the mantle as a result.Rajdeep Dasgupta (Photo by Jeff Fitlow/Rice University)“What is neat is that with the onset and the expected tempo of crustal burial into the deep mantle starting just prior to the GOE, and with our experimental data on the efficiency of deep burial of reduced carbon, we could model the expected rise of atmospheric oxygen across the GOE,” Dasgupta said.The research supports the findings of a 2016 paper by fellow Rice petrologist Cin-Ty Lee and colleagues that suggested that plate tectonics, continent formation and the appearance of early life were key factors in the development of an oxygen-rich atmosphere on Earth.Duncan, who increasingly focuses on exoplanetary systems, said the research could provide important clues about what scientists should look for when evaluating which exoplanets could support life.The research is supported by the National Science Foundation and the Deep Carbon Observatory.-30-High-resolution IMAGES are available for download at:http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/SearchPhotos/photo.pl?mission=ISS007&roll=E&frame=10807CAPTION: Earth’s atmosphere, as seen in 2003 from the International Space Station, hasn’t always contained large amounts of oxygen. Petrologists from Rice University and the Carnegie Institution recreated hot, high-pressure conditions from 60 miles below Earth’s surface in search of new clues about the “great oxidation event” that added large amounts of oxygen to the atmosphere around 2.4 billion years ago. (Photo courtesy of ISS Expedition 7 Crew, EOL, NASA)http://news.rice.edu/files/2017/04/0424_DASGUPTA-md76-lg-27nebxx.jpgCAPTION: Megan Duncan (Photo by Jeff Fitlow/Rice University)http://news.rice.edu/files/2017/04/0424_DASGUPTA-rd30-lg-1fhby43.jpgCAPTION: Rajdeep Dasgupta (Photo by Jeff Fitlow/Rice University)http://news.rice.edu/files/2017/04/0424_DASGUPTA-toon-lg-1y7drlg.jpgCAPTION: This schematic depicts the efficient deep subduction of organic (reduced) carbon, a process that could have locked significant amounts of carbon in Earth’s mantle and resulted in a higher percentage of atmospheric oxygen. Based on new high-pressure, high-temperature experiments, Rice University petrologists argue that the long-term sequestration of organic carbon from this process began as early as 2.5 billion years ago and helped bring about a well-known buildup of oxygen in Earth’s atmosphere — the “Great Oxidation Event” — about 2.4 billion years ago. (Image courtesy of R. Dasgupta/Rice University)The DOI of the Nature Geoscience paper is: 10.1038/ngeo2939A copy of the paper is available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ngeo2939More information is available at:Experimental Petrology Rice Team: http://dasgupta.rice.edu/expertSimilar research from Rice:Study: Earth’s carbon points to planetary smashup — Sept. 5, 2016http://news.rice.edu/2016/09/05/study-earths-carbon-points-to-planetary-smashup/Oxygen atmosphere recipe = tectonics + continents + life — May 16, 2016http://news.rice.edu/2016/05/16/oxygen-atmosphere-recipe-tectonics-continents-life/Going deep to study long-term climate evolution — Oct. 31, 2013http://news.rice.edu/2013/10/31/going-deep-to-study-long-term-climate-evolution/Earth scientist Dasgupta lands NSF CAREER Award — March 21, 2013http://news.rice.edu/2013/03/21/earth-scientist-dasgupta-lands-nsf-career-award/Magma in mantle has deep impact — Jan. 9, 2013http://news.rice.edu/2013/01/09/magma-in-mantle-has-deep-impact/Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,879 undergraduates and 2,861 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for happiest students and for lots of race/class interaction by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to http://tinyurl.com/RiceUniversityoverview.last_img read more

Hurricane Harvey Registry can help far beyond Houston

first_imghttp://news.rice.edu/files/2018/09/1008_HARVEY-1-WEB-z0sp3z.jpgThe Hurricane Harvey Registry team staffed a table at Minute Maid Park this summer to encourage participation in the project by Astros fans. From left: Justin Onwenu, Snehil Maknojia, Henry Leong, Rashida Callender, Rice Provost Marie Lynn Miranda and Albert Cheng. (Credit: Hurricane Harvey Registry) Return to article. Long Description Return to article. Long DescriptionHurricane Harvey bears down on the Gulf Coast in August 2017. The Hurricane Harvey Registry is gathering information from Greater Houstonians to help the region plan for future storms.The registry serves two purposes: First, to gain long-term understanding of the storm’s social and environmental impact on the region, and second, to offer statistics-based tools that help other regions recover and plan for the future.Rice Provost Marie Lynn Miranda, the project’s director, has ties to both Houston and North Carolina, where Hurricane Florence made landfall Sept. 14. The former professor at North Carolina’s Duke University knows that region has a tough road ahead.“We’re ready, willing and able to make our tools and technology available to North and South Carolina,” said Miranda, a faculty member in Rice’s statistics department. “The National Institutes of Health has already contacted us to ask if we could be part of their response there, and in Hawaii for Hurricane Lane.” Lane dropped more than 50 inches of rain on Hawaii in late August.Miranda said she’s also talked with North Carolina and South Carolina public health officials whom she knows through a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention training program on using geospatial tools in public health.She and her colleagues at Rice, the City of Houston Health Department, the Environmental Defense Fund and public health officials in Harris, Fort Bend and Montgomery counties introduced the registry in April to gather data about Hurricane Harvey and its aftermath. Participants are asked to fill out a survey that takes about 10 minutes to complete. It contains questions about their health and homes during and since the 2017 storm.The data will provide key information for designing intervention programs now, allow officials to refine their responses to future weather crises and serve as a model to help others recover from disasters, a goal in line with Rice’s Vision for the Second Century, Second Decade. The Hurricane Harvey Registry team staffed a table at Minute Maid Park this summer to encourage participation in the project by Astros fans. From left: Justin Onwenu, Snehil Maknojia, Henry Leong, Rashida Callender, Rice Provost Marie Lynn Miranda and Albert Chang. (Credit: Hurricane Harvey Registry) http://news.rice.edu/files/2018/09/1008_HARVEY-2-WEB-wxrgmh.jpgHurricane Harvey bears down on the Gulf Coast in August 2017. The Hurricane Harvey Registry is gathering information from Greater Houstonians to help the region plan for future storms.Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,970 undergraduates and 2,934 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is just under 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for lots of race/class interaction and No. 2 for quality of life by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to http://tinyurl.com/RiceUniversityoverview. Hurricane Harvey bears down on the Gulf Coast in August 2017. The Hurricane Harvey Registry is gathering information from Greater Houstonians to help the region plan for future storms. Return to article. Long Descriptioncenter_img The Hurricane Harvey Registry team staffed a table at Minute Maid Park this summer to encourage participation in the project by Astros fans. From left: Justin Onwenu, Snehil Maknojia, Henry Leong, Rashida Callender, Rice Provost Marie Lynn Miranda and Albert Chang. (Credit: Hurricane Harvey Registry) Hurricane Harvey bears down on the Gulf Coast in August 2017. The Hurricane Harvey Registry is gathering information from Greater Houstonians to help the region plan for future storms. AddThis Share8NEWS RELEASEEditor’s note: Links to high-resolution images for download appear at the end of this release.David Ruth713-348-6327david@rice.eduMike Williams713-348-6728mikewilliams@rice.eduHurricane Harvey Registry can help far beyond HoustonRice U. team offers tools to North Carolina, South Carolina while building local databaseHOUSTON – (Oct. 9, 2018) – Greater Houstonians can help residents of other storm-ravaged states while helping themselves by participating in the Hurricane Harvey Registry. Return to article. Long DescriptionThe Hurricane Harvey Registry team staffed a table at Minute Maid Park this summer to encourage participation in the project by Astros fans. From left: Justin Onwenu, Snehil Maknojia, Henry Leong, Rashida Callender, Rice Provost Marie Lynn Miranda and Albert Cheng. Courtesy of the Hurricane Harvey RegistryMore than 2,000 citizens have taken the survey to date. The registry is seeking at least 5,000 participants to ensure a representative sample of what Greater Houstonians experienced during and after Harvey. With enough responses, Miranda’s team and the survey’s host, Rice’s Kinder Institute for Urban Research through its Urban Data Platform, will establish a data set that public health officials, policy makers and researchers can draw upon for years to come.The researchers said it’s important for those who didn’t suffer damage during or after Harvey to participate. “Even if they didn’t have a lot of damage, we need to put those who were impacted in the context of the entire community,” said Eric Bakota, an analyst with Harris County Public Health. “It’s a good way to give us a clear resolution of what’s going on.”It’s also important for participants to know the personal data they enter is secure, said Katherine Ensor, a Rice professor of statistics and Urban Data Platform director. “We want to assure everyone that this data set will not be publicly available,” she said. “It’s a secure registry, and only aggregate information will be shared with the city and county, and with researchers who apply for access.”Registry officials ask participants to share their names and contact information for the opportunity to follow up on their situations in the months and years to come. “This will help us to understand the storm’s long-term impact,” Ensor said.To get people on board, registry staff are going directly to communities. Rice has hired two community coordinators to work with neighborhood leaders and plans to hire a third, Spanish-speaking coordinator to expand the survey’s reach.“On my first day here, I noticed a majority of respondents so far, about 75 percent, are women,” said project manager Rashida Callender, an associate in research who has a master’s of public health in biostatistics degree. “The majority were also white, about 80 percent. And definitely the majority were non-Hispanic. That helped shape my initial outreach.”She and recent Rice alumnus Justin Onwenu ’18 are establishing relationships with Greater Houston neighborhoods and going to their meetings to register residents. “Being there helps us to assuage their concerns about participating and also to explain the scientific concepts and why this is important,” Callender said.They also staffed a registry table at Houston Astros games this summer and plan to do the same in collaboration with the Houston Rockets this fall.-30-Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews.Images for download:last_img read more

Family of Teen Beaten in Facebook Live Video Deliver a Statement

first_img Show Discussion Share Family of Teen Beaten in Facebook Live Video Deliver a Statement By Jack Phillips January 8, 2017 Updated: January 8, 2017  LINKEDINPINTERESTREDDITTUMBLRSTUMBLEUPON   Share this article The family of a mentally disabled teenager who was allegedly beaten by four Chicago teens as the incident was streamed on Facebook Live has spoken out, saying it should have never happened.The victim’s brother-in-law, David Boyd, in a statement, said: “We appreciate all of the support from everyone. We haven’t spoken to anyone but each other. But, we’ve read what’s out there and we really appreciate it.”He said that the 18-year-old is doing well, but added that it “should never happen.”Four people were charged in the incident. They were identified as Jordan Hill, Tesfaye Cooper, Brittany Covington, and Tanishia Covington. They are accused of beating and torturing the teen, telling him to say epithets against “white people” and “Donald Trump” in the video.(Gofundme) (Gofundme)“We’re so grateful for all the prayers and efforts that led to the safe return of our brother. We’re fully aware of the charges being brought against the offenders. At this time we ask for continued prayers for all those involved, for our family’s privacy as we cope and heal,” Boyd added to Fox32. Related CoverageJudge Refuses to Release 4 Accused of Beating Disabled YouthPolice say the victim went to school with one of his assailants and he was picked up by Hill at a McDonald’s before taken to an undisclosed location. According to the Independent Journal Review, his family got text messages telling them their disabled son was being held captive.A Go Fund Me page was created to  support of the victim and his family, raising more than $126,000 in several days. US last_img read more