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Judge Denkin wins Chief Justice Award for Judicial Excellence

first_img Jul 12, 2019 News in Photos Judge Denkin wins Chief Justice Award for Judicial Excellence Sarasota County Judge David Denkin is the 2019 recipient of the Chief Justice Award for Judicial Excellence.Chief Justice Charles T. Canady presented the award to Judge Denkin at the Conference of County Court Judges of Florida’s recent meeting in Orlando.“Judge Denkin exhibits the discipline of a committed scholar, the passion of a gifted educator, and the fidelity of a public servant,” wrote one fellow judge in support of Judge Denkin’s nomination for the award.Judge Denkin, a county court judge since 2003, has been recognized for his efforts in Sarasota County and as a leader within the branch for many years. Three years after rising to the bench, he was appointed administrative judge for Sarasota County Court, a leadership position. He earned his law degree from Stetson University.Denkin is concluding his term as president of the Conference of County Court Judges of Florida. Among his duties in that role is advocating on behalf of Conference of County Court Judges of Florida issues. He has taken numerous leadership positions in judicial education, teaching programs at the Florida Judicial College, the DUI Traffic-Adjudication Lab, the College of Advanced Judicial Studies, and the National Judicial College. Judge Denkin served as Education Committee chair for the Conference of County Court Judges, as dean of the DUI Adjudication Lab Program, and as associate dean and dean of the Florida Judicial College.“Judges look to David as the go-to person, whether it is for education or in his leadership roles. We all know of one person we can ask to jump and complete a task, David is that person,” wrote another fellow judge in support of Denkin’s nomination.The Chief Justice Awards for Judicial Excellence, established in 2014 and bestowed annually, recognize one county court judge and one circuit judge who demonstrate exceptional commitment to the judicial branch and who personify judicial excellence. The circuit judge recipient will be announced in August.last_img read more

Politics, kids, golf (not necessarily in that order) for Gulbis

first_imgNatalie Gulbis has political aspirations. She turned down a chance to run for the congressional seat in the third district of Nevada after giving it serious consideration last year, but she is keeping her eye on other opportunities, especially something that will allow her to be an advocate for youth. She loves children. “I would love to have kids,” she said. “We’ve been trying.” So many paths exist for the 35-year-old married LPGA pro, whose Cover Girl looks and charismatic personality continue to keep her in demand through all the injuries that have challenged her for the better part of the last decade. She had her own reality TV show on Golf Channel, appeared on “Celebrity Apprentice,” an episode of “CSI” and on “The Price is Right.” She worked as an analyst for Fox Sports’ golf coverage and modeled for an SI Swimsuit Issue and FHM magazine. She calls opening the Natalie Gulbis Boys and Girls Club in Las Vegas in 2010 her greatest achievement. Photos: Natalie Gulbis through the years Her talents abound, but … “I still love competing,” Gulbis said. “I love being an athlete, everything about being an athlete, even coming back from injuries. That’s part of being a professional athlete. “The physical therapy, the work and discipline it takes to come back, I know it sounds like I’m sugar coating things, but I’ve enjoyed the whole process. Yes, you would rather be out on tour, but I’m excited for another opportunity to come back and play.” And that’s why after undergoing her fourth back surgery, a discectomy last October, she isn’t ready to give up the game to pursue another endeavor. Those other opportunities, whatever they may be, can wait. There’s still golf to be pursued, from her return to the LPGA this year to her introduction as the newest headliner for the American Century Championship celebrity event in Lake Tahoe, July 13-15 (click here for more information). She will be announced with much fanfare by tournament organizers on Tuesday. “As frustrating as it can be, I still love the game,” Gulbis said. “Last weekend, I wanted to break every single club in my bag. Today, I want get back out there and figure it out.” Gulbis made a promising start last week at the Walmart NW Arkansas Championship, putting up a 69 in the first round to get into early contention, before faltering with a 74 to miss the cut. It was just her fifth start this year. After seven months away while recovering from her last back surgery, she launched her comeback in April at the Hugel-JTBC L.A. Open. She made the cut, but it’s been a slow climb since, with four missed cuts. “It’s good to be back, but it’s also frustrating,” said Gulbis, who claimed the Evian Championship as her lone LPGA title in 2007, long before it was a major. “I haven’t played that many events, so I haven’t played that well. You can’t substitute competition. “I haven’t had any issues with ball striking. It’s my putting, and course management mistakes. I’m making mistakes I feel like I made early in my career, but the more I play the more confident I am that it will work itself out.” Gulbis played just five events last year, playing around back pain that returned in late spring of 2017. She hurt herself hitting a shot from a buried lie in the front of a bunker near season’s start. “I took a couple weeks off, tried to recover, but I knew I needed surgery again,” she said. “I hoped I wouldn’t need it, that my back would repair itself, with some different modalities, hyperbaric chamber and rest, but it wasn’t helping.” So Gulbis elected to have another discectomy, and she is grateful she did. “Within just a couple weeks, I felt better than I had all year, since I was injured,” she said. “To be able to walk without pain, travel without pain, and just to be able to play golf again, forget the competition, was great. I like to play a lot.” Gulbis had her first back surgery in 2008. She has been limited in how much she can practice since that first surgery, but she relishes the time she gets. Making her return in Los Angeles was special, she said. There are so many new, young players on tour, but still so many old friends. “It was like the first day of school and a high school reunion,” she said. Scores still matter to Gulbis, but she keeps score in a lot of ways. The charitable function of tournament golf matters to her, as does growing the game. “I enjoy being part of that,” she said. It’s what continues to make her one of the game’s most devoted ambassadors.last_img read more

‘Veteran’ Novak hopes to find role on young Jazz team

first_img Bulked-up Hayward looks to play with an edge this season Related Initially when I got traded here I knew immediately who they were with their young core. Obviously we are a young team and guys like me and Trevor (Booker), we are the veterans and neither of us have ever been the veteran guys before. – Steve NovakSALT LAKE CITY — Steve Novak has been around the NBA for a few years, playing for six different teams over the past nine seasons.This year he finds himself in a completely different situation as the old man on a team of youngsters. Of the 13 players with fully guaranteed contracts, the 31-year-old Novak is the only player over 30 years old and much older than the next oldest player.Novak is nearly 4½ years older than the next oldest Jazz player, fifth-year forward Jeremy Evans, who turns 27 later this month. Another new Jazz player, Trevor Booker, turns 27 next month. Dahntay Jones, who signed last week to an apparent non-guaranteed deal, is the only one of 19 players in camp older than Novak at age 33.Novak is happy to embrace his role as the veteran on a very young team.“Initially when I got traded here I knew immediately who they were with their young core,’’ Novak said. “Obviously we are a young team and guys like me and Trevor, we are the veterans and neither of us have ever been the veteran guys before.’’The 6-foot-10, 235-pound Novak is known for his outside shooting and is expected to be a player who can come off the bench and knock down 3-point shots. He has played for Houston, L.A. Clippers, Dallas, San Antonio, New York and Toronto, with his best seasons coming with the Knicks in 2011-13, when he averaged 7.5 points and shot 44.1 percent from 3-point range and 88.1 percent from the foul line over the two years.So far Novak has been impressed with what he’s seen of the young Jazz team.“In terms of character and guys, we’ve got good people, I could tell that right away,’’ he said. “There’s a fine line that makes you better than you should be or not as good as you should have been. There’s no question that the guys here are high-character guys.’’After his two years in New York, Novak was traded to Toronto before last season, but he wasn’t utilized as much with the Raptors and his numbers dropped off. But he expects to fit in well with Utah.“I’ve been in the league nine years and I’ve been in different situations where I’ve played for a coach who was heavily offensed like Mike D’Antoni or Rick Adelman, and I’ve played for coaches that were all defense like Jeff Van Gundy or last year with Dwane Casey,’’ he said. “So it’s very much about finding the right spot, being used in the right way and also fitting into your role.“Here with the way Quin wants to play and the group that we have — we want to score the ball, we want to shoot 3-pointers, we want to play up-tempo, so I see myself fitting in well. I think as long as I can make shots, there’ll be a role for me.’’SPECIAL PLACE: So what does Novak think about coming to Salt Lake after spending his most recent seasons in big cities like New York and Toronto and previously playing in Los Angeles?“I’m from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, so I’m from the good ol’ Midwest, where you don’t have all the hustle and bustle,’’ he said. “Being in New York and Toronto and L.A. was awesome and I know that every NBA town I’m in, I always try to make the most of it. I definitely appreciate being able to get from place to place in 15 minutes, and a little bit lower cost of living is always nice, so I definitely have a special place in my heart for Utah.’’YOUNG AND YOUNGER: Seventeen of the 19 players in training camp for the Jazz are age 26 or younger. The most common ages among the players are 23 and 24, with five players each at those ages. Two are 21, two are 22 and two are 26. The youngest player is Dante Exum at 19 and the oldest is Dahntay Jones at 33.MURPHY’S BACK: He’s back, but a lot Jazz fans may have forgotten Kevin Murphy has already spent part of a season with the team.Murphy was a second-round pick for the Jazz out of Tennessee Tech in 2012, the 47th overall pick in the NBA draft. He was assigned to Reno of the D-League, less than a month into the 2013-14 season, but was later recalled by the Jazz and played in just 17 games, scoring a grand total of 15 points in 52 minutes.He was traded to Golden State after the season and last year he went to play in Europe for a few months before returning to the D-League again where he averaged 25.5 points for the Idaho Stampede and was named an all-star.“I’m happy for the opportunity to try and make the team,’’ Murphy said. “It’s nice to be back here, I feel like I’m home again.’’last_img read more

Masterpiece restored: Stolen Stradivarius will sing again

first_img In this Wednesday, March 8, 2017 photo, violinist Mira Wang plays the Ames Stradivarius violin in New York. After a meticulous restoration that took more than a year, the Stradivarius violin that was stolen from violinist Roman Totenberg is about to return to the stage. Wang, a former student of Totenberg’s, will play the instrument at a private concert in New York on March 13. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig) In this Wednesday, March 8, 2017 photo, the Ames Stradivarius violin is seen in New York. After a meticulous restoration that took more than a year, the Ames Stradivarius violin that was stolen from violinist Roman Totenberg is about to return to the stage. Violinist Mira Wang, a former student of Totenberg’s, will play the instrument at a private concert in New York on March 13. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig) In this Wednesday, March 8, 2017 photo, violinist Mira Wang plays the Ames Stradivarius violin in New York. After a meticulous restoration that took more than a year, the Ames Stradivarius violin that was stolen from violinist Roman Totenberg is about to return to the stage. Wang, a former student of Totenberg’s, will play the instrument at a private concert in New York on March 13. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig) WASHINGTON | After a meticulous restoration that took more than a year, a Stradivarius violin that was stolen from violinist Roman Totenberg and missing for decades is about to return to the stage.Mira Wang, a violinist who immigrated to the United States from China 30 years ago to study under Totenberg, will play the instrument at a private concert in New York on March 13, and more performances after that are possible.center_img In this Wednesday, March 8, 2017 photo, Tatsuo Imaishi makes an adjustment on the Ames Stradivarius violin in New York. After a meticulous restoration that took more than a year, the Stradivarius violin that was stolen from violinist Roman Totenberg is about to return to the stage. Violinist Mira Wang, a former student of Totenberg’s, will play the instrument at a private concert in New York on March 13. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig) The violin known as the Ames Stradivarius is one of roughly 550 surviving instruments made by Antonio Stradivari, history’s most renowned violin maker. Built in 1734, it’s likely worth millions of dollars, although it hasn’t been appraised since it was recovered.It was stolen in 1980 while Totenberg was greeting well-wishers after a performance in Boston, and wasn’t recovered until 2015, three years after Totenberg died at age 102.The presumed thief, journeyman violinist Philip Johnson, was himself dying of pancreatic cancer when he showed his ex-wife a locked violin case in his basement. Nearly four years after his death, she took the violin inside the case for an appraisal and learned it was the stolen Stradivarius. It was soon returned to Totenberg’s family.It’s not clear how often Johnson played the instrument, but The Washington Post reported that he played it in public as recently as 2011, the year he died.For Totenberg’s three daughters, who like their father had given up hope that they’d ever see the violin again, its recovery has been a series of joys. Jill Totenberg compared it to “Christmas, even though we’re Jewish.”They’ll hear it again at Wang’s performance for the first time since it disappeared.“I’m sure we’ll all cry. I’m absolutely sure of it. Whether we cry at the same time is something else, but we definitely will cry,” she said. “When that violin was returned to us, we really felt like our father was back in the room with us that day.”Another happy surprise: 35 years after it disappeared, the violin wasn’t in bad shape. Johnson couldn’t take it to a repair shop without being discovered, and he used Super Glue and Elmer’s to patch a few spots. It was unplayable because it had no strings and the sound post inside was broken. But when Bruno Price of Rare Violins of New York first laid eyes on the instrument, he was pleased it was so well-preserved. He and the Totenbergs believe Johnson couldn’t have played it all that often.“For us, in the restoration of the violin, it was purely conservation rather than any serious repairs of any kind,” Price said. “So, in a way, the violin is probably in better shape for having been stolen — a horrible thing to say.”Price and his staff took their time with the restoration, trying to make as few major repairs as possible. They sealed some cracks, fixed the broken sound post and replaced the neck, which must be done periodically anyway.For Totenberg’s three daughters — Jill, a public-relations executive; Nina, the legal-affairs correspondent for National Public Radio; and Amy, a federal judge — there was no question that Wang would play the violin first.“I’m not sure she assumed it, but all three of us assumed it,” Nina Totenberg said. “She really is like the fourth Totenberg sister.”For Wang, the instrument presents its own challenges, even though she’s been playing her own Stradivarius for two decades. She had about a month to practice before the concert, a timetable she compares to a jockey hopping on an unfamiliar racehorse just before a race.“To be able to really know a violin of that caliber, you need years. You need years to really know the nuances and to bring out the certain colors and bring out the different varieties of sound,” Wang said. “But we’ll make the best out of it.”Wang will perform two chamber pieces: a string quintet by Felix Mendelssohn and a piano quintet by Antonin Dvorak.No additional concerts are scheduled, but it’s possible that Wang will get more opportunities to play the violin. The family plans to sell it eventually, either to a musician or to a person or organization that ensures it will continue to be played and maintained.“In the end, there’s going to be one person (for whom) it’s going to suit their type of playing even more perfectly than with Mira,” Price said. “There’s a very personal connection that comes with these great instruments, but it sounds fantastic.”Follow Ben Nuckols on Twitter at https://twitter.com/APBenNuckols .last_img read more

Ex-high school coach guilty of sex with player, jailed

first_imgCliff FosterPITTSBURGH (AP) _ A former high school basketball coach has pleaded guilty to having sex with a 16-year-old female player and been sentenced to 11 1/2 to 23 months in jail.Cliff Foster, 33, was sentenced after pleading guilty Wednesday to institutional sexual assault and corruption of minors for his relationship with the Pine-Richland High School player.Foster pleaded guilty to spare the girl the trauma of a trial, defense attorney Robert Andrews said.Foster had been jailed since Jan. 19, after prosecutors said he violated his bond by contacting the girl several times between Nov. 26 and Jan. 4. Foster sent the girl a silver necklace, wrote her a love letter and called her through his sister, Allegheny County prosecutors said.Foster must also serve seven years’ probation and register as a sex offender after he gets out of jail, and can’t contact the girl for 10 years.The sexual relationship began in April and ended in October after police arrested Foster once a county child welfare caseworker reported about a possible relationship Foster was having with the girl.The girl also played for an Amateur Athletic Union club team Foster founded and allegedly had sex with him in hotel rooms on trips to Florida, Illinois, Kentucky, Ohio and Washington D.C.last_img read more

Lofty aims to help aged

first_imgBy ANEEKA SIMONIS CARDINIA Shire Council plans to lobby land developers to build appropriate housing for older people as population…[To read the rest of this story Subscribe or Login to the Gazette Access Pass] Thanks for reading the Pakenham Berwick Gazette. Subscribe or Login to read the rest of this content with the Gazette Digital Access Pass subscription.last_img